24
Sun, Jun
14 New Articles

Including Data Sharing in Science Teaching

Instruction

When students come to IslandWood to experience the opportunity to conduct a scientific investigation, they are introduced with noticing the environment around them, and then asked to make wonder statements that can perhaps lead to an investigable question. Students get to direct their investigations, which can lead to exploring phenomena that is happening in the garden, at Mac’s Pond, or the Harbor. The students go through a scientific process of making observations, asking questions, making a claim, gatherings evidence, analyzing and developing a conclusion. As teachers, we often talk about next steps of why it’s important to share data, however its important to model that step as well.

I have incorporated the important use of data sharing by collaborating with other instructors to conduct similar investigations. If we do conduct similar investigations, students can share and record other data collected by other scientists.  This activity is called “IslandWood Science Convention.” The idea that students from different schools come together to share data has also proved to enhance other skills such as interpersonal skills, gain confidence in their work, and ability to refine their public speaking skills.

Interpersonal skills are essential to be successful in both academics and in life. By conducting a science investigation, students will have an opportunity to practice:Bilan 1

Verbal communication: Students gain opportunities to meet new students from other schools. They get to share some things they may have in common. They also get to share their scientific findings.

Listening: Students listen to one another as others share data. This is an important part of data sharing because the data recorded will require them to do math, and if it’s not recorded accurately, it will compromise the results.

Negotiation: As scientists, students have to decide on some norms during the convention. A common problem that is up for discussion is whether or not to round up a decimal and count it as a whole species or count down? Students discuss how they will interpret their data, and use those rules across the board.

Bilan 2Problem Solving: Students problem solve by using math to find the average of their data. With internal rules of data gathering in place, all students work together to find similar averages and develop conclusions.

Decision making: Throughout the science investigation and during the convention, students are constantly making decisions for their scientific community. They are making decisions on what to investigate, how they will keep their data consistent, and deciding on their findings as one large community, just like it is in the real world.

Confidence in their work: I notice how confident students get in sharing their data because they had a chance to work in small groups, then share with just their cohort, before coming to the convention. All steps were taken in group settings, so no one felt left behind. This lent itself well to when we came together in the convention because each group came with having prior debrief of data collected.

Bilan 3During the debrief at the convention, almost all students had an opportunity to present in front of their peer audience members. They receive coaching such as how to physically position themselves to face the audience, articulate their findings, and answer questions from the audience. They may be used to sharing ideas in front of peers from their own school, but rarely will they have an opportunity to speak to other students. Practicing public speaking will serve students throughout their academic career and is highly regarded by employers. Great public speakers tend to earn leadership positions, which is why it is important to start early.

After students present their scientific investigations and findings, we transition to a debrief. During the debrief of convention, students are asked:

  • Why is it important to share data?
  • What would happen if we did not find value in sharing data?
  • How does data influence our decision making?

Bilan 4All students share their experience in why it is important to share their scientific data, and even give examples. Their thoughts and wisdom give a fresh perspective on the value of communication, which is to advance our learning of the world around us. Today’s students will be our future scientists and will be challenged to solve global problems. Merging science and interpersonal skills will reduce the gap of scientific evidence and public willingness to make crucial decisions that will affect our environment.

 

 

 

When students come to IslandWood to experience the opportunity to conduct a scientific investigation, they are introduced with noticing the environment around them, and then asked to make wonder statements that can perhaps lead to an investigable question. Students get to direct their investigations, which can lead to exploring phenomena that is happening in the garden, at Mac’s Pond, or the Harbor. The students go through a scientific process of making observations, asking questions, making a claim, gatherings evidence, analyzing and developing a conclusion. As teachers, we often talk about next steps of why it’s important to share data, however its important to model that step as well.

I have incorporated the important use of data sharing by collaborating with other instructors to conduct similar investigations. If we do conduct similar investigations, students can share and record other data collected by other scientists.  This activity is called “IslandWood Science Convention.” The idea that students from different schools come together to share data has also proved to enhance other skills such as interpersonal skills, gain confidence in their work, and ability to refine their public speaking skills.

Interpersonal skills are essential to be successful in both academics and in life. By conducting a science investigation, students will have an opportunity to practice:Bilan 1

Verbal communication: Students gain opportunities to meet new students from other schools. They get to share some things they may have in common. They also get to share their scientific findings.

Listening: Students listen to one another as others share data. This is an important part of data sharing because the data recorded will require them to do math, and if it’s not recorded accurately, it will compromise the results.

Negotiation: As scientists, students have to decide on some norms during the convention. A common problem that is up for discussion is whether or not to round up a decimal and count it as a whole species or count down? Students discuss how they will interpret their data, and use those rules across the board.

Bilan 2Problem Solving: Students problem solve by using math to find the average of their data. With internal rules of data gathering in place, all students work together to find similar averages and develop conclusions.

Decision making: Throughout the science investigation and during the convention, students are constantly making decisions for their scientific community. They are making decisions on what to investigate, how they will keep their data consistent, and deciding on their findings as one large community, just like it is in the real world.

Confidence in their work: I notice how confident students get in sharing their data because they had a chance to work in small groups, then share with just their cohort, before coming to the convention. All steps were taken in group settings, so no one felt left behind. This lent itself well to when we came together in the convention because each group came with having prior debrief of data collected.

Bilan 3During the debrief at the convention, almost all students had an opportunity to present in front of their peer audience members. They receive coaching such as how to physically position themselves to face the audience, articulate their findings, and answer questions from the audience. They may be used to sharing ideas in front of peers from their own school, but rarely will they have an opportunity to speak to other students. Practicing public speaking will serve students throughout their academic career and is highly regarded by employers. Great public speakers tend to earn leadership positions, which is why it is important to start early.

After students present their scientific investigations and findings, we transition to a debrief. During the debrief of convention, students are asked:

  • Why is it important to share data?
  • What would happen if we did not find value in sharing data?
  • How does data influence our decision making?

Bilan 4All students share their experience in why it is important to share their scientific data, and even give examples. Their thoughts and wisdom give a fresh perspective on the value of communication, which is to advance our learning of the world around us. Today’s students will be our future scientists and will be challenged to solve global problems. Merging science and interpersonal skills will reduce the gap of scientific evidence and public willingness to make crucial decisions that will affect our environment.

 

 

 

About the Author
Bilan Aden
Author: Bilan Aden

Bilan Aden is a graduate student at IslandWood and is pursuing a master’s degree in Education Curriculum and Instruction from University of Washington. Her passion is in philanthropy, with a focus in increasing access to quality educational programs for parents and youth. She is equally as passionate in addressing homelessness and its effects on child development.